ABOUT US

The Bluestocking is an online publication started by a group of aspiring young  students with hopes to provide like-minded individuals a place to form ideas and camaraderie.The publication will have monthly issues/prints embracing themes ranging from significant historical movements to the current social and political climate.  

 

The Bluestocking publishes under three major heads, namely,  Policy & Economics, Culture & Society and Art & History. We strongly believe in the essence of free expression and appreciate it in all of its forms. Consequently, we accept submissions of varying kinds ranging from Articles, poems & prose, open letters and comic strips to digital art and paintings. 

We, as a group have always been interested in the ‘why’ and the ‘how’ of the world issues. Asking questions and looking for their answers is an intrinsic and deeply ingrained aspect of our writers. For us, ignorance has never been bliss, figuring out the system that this world is fueled by and uncovering the right and wrong behind it is the only way we know how. 

 

Progressing into an unpredictable future, and considering the current political and social scenario of the world, we need to step up and talk about the path we want this world to take. Access to information and a platform to voice our concerns, feelings and thoughts is an imperative step towards shaping the future that we envision for ourselves.

And for that we need a safe space, where diversity, idiosyncrasies and unfiltered truth are appreciated and encouraged. 

 

So, in order to create a safe and independent space for the youth, we have undertaken this endeavour to build a cohesive and close knit community. So that we, the students and the youth can break free from intellectual elitism and access unrestricted information. 

 

We aim to talk about social and political issues that plague our community, be it national or transnational that are often forgotten and buried too soon. We wish to start a conversation about the aforementioned so that these crucial issues are kept alight and in notice, long enough to create an exigent change. We wish to create an avenue of conversation where no topic or issue is too insignificant to talk about.

 

Ultimately, we want to create an independent space for people to ideate, debate and explore notions slipstreamed by a passion to create the right kind of awareness- sensitive and respectful of everyone. 

History of the bluestockings

"If you were to look up the word “bluestocking” in dictionaries, most of them would perhaps describe it along the lines of a noun meaning “an intellectual or literary woman.” However, to describe it so takes away the historical significance of the word. The story of the Bluestockings goes back to the early 1750s when Elizabeth Montagu, Elizabeth Vesey, and others created The Bluestockings Society as a group to discuss literature, society, and politics with other women and men alike.


This gathering of women was a refreshing change from the traditional card-playing and musical evenings that were previously associated with them. Though these women were mostly well-off and conservative, their gatherings were rather radical for a time that belittled female intellect and made little allowance for education for girls and women.
The name of the society can be attributed to the European fashion of the mid–18th century in which black stockings were worn in formal dress and blue stockings were considered daytime or more informal wear. However, most historians believe that the actual source of the name was Bishop Benjamin Stillingfleet, the famous botanist and translator.

He was invited to a literary meeting by Mrs. Vesey but declined the invitation citing the lack of proper evening clothes. To that, the lady replied, “Don’t mind dress! Come in your blue stockings!” He did so, and Bluestocking Society soon became a nickname. The Bluestocking women supported each other in intellectual endeavors such as reading, artwork, and writing. Many also published literature. Author, Elizabeth Carter was a Bluestocking Society advocate and member who published essays and poetry and also translated Epictetus. Contemporary author, Anna Miegon compiled biographical sketches of these women in her work “Biographical Sketches of Principal Bluestocking Women.”
By naming our magazine “The Bluestocking,” we seek to acknowledge and
appreciate the work done by the ladies of the Bluestocking Society in expanding
and redefining the social position and roles of women. Not unlike these great

women, we hope to establish an inclusive team which discusses wordly affairs and forms informed opinions."

History of the bluestockings

"If you were to look up the word “bluestocking” in dictionaries, most of them would perhaps describe it along the lines of a noun meaning “an intellectual or literary woman.” However, to describe it so takes away the historical significance of the word. The story of the Bluestockings goes back to the early 1750s when Elizabeth Montagu, Elizabeth Vesey, and others created The Bluestockings Society as a group to discuss literature, society, and politics with other women and men alike.


This gathering of women was a refreshing change from the traditional card-playing and musical evenings that were previously associated with them. Though these women were mostly well-off and conservative, their gatherings were rather radical for a time that belittled female intellect and made little allowance for education for girls and women.
The name of the society can be attributed to the European fashion of the mid–18th century in which black stockings were worn in formal dress and blue stockings were considered daytime or more informal wear. However, most historians believe that the actual source of the name was Bishop Benjamin Stillingfleet, the famous botanist and translator.

He was invited to a literary meeting by Mrs. Vesey but declined the invitation citing the lack of proper evening clothes. To that, the lady replied, “Don’t mind dress! Come in your blue stockings!” He did so, and Bluestocking Society soon became a nickname. The Bluestocking women supported each other in intellectual endeavors such as reading, artwork, and writing. Many also published literature. Author, Elizabeth Carter was a Bluestocking Society advocate and member who published essays and poetry and also translated Epictetus. Contemporary author, Anna Miegon compiled biographical sketches of these women in her work “Biographical Sketches of Principal Bluestocking Women.”
By naming our magazine “The Bluestocking,” we seek to acknowledge and
appreciate the work done by the ladies of the Bluestocking Society in expanding
and redefining the social position and roles of women. Not unlike these great

women, we hope to establish an inclusive team which discusses wordly affairs and forms informed opinions."

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